An Idea Called Tomorrow


Press Release

Multi-Venue Exhibition An Idea Called Tomorrow Invites Fifteen Contemporary Artists to Examine Issues of Social Justice in the Future

Now through March 7, 2010

California African American Museum (CAAM) and the Skirball Cultural Center

Unprecedented Exhibition Features Work by Artists Kim Abeles, Castillo, Abdelali Dahrouch, Joyce Dallal, Charles Dickson, Graham Goddard, John Halaka, Betty Nobue Kano, Kwahuumba and Karen Seneferu, Sonia BasSheva Manjon, Yong Soon Min, Dominique Moody, John Outterbridge, and Ingrid Von Sydow

(Los Angeles – November 2009) An Idea Called Tomorrow is on view – now through March 7, 2010 – at two Los Angeles institutions, as part of a unique collaborative partnership between the California African American Museum (CAAM) and the Skirball Cultural Center. Co-conceived by CAAM and the Skirball and organized by CAAM, with the goal of inspiring visitors to reflect upon the active role we must all play in bringing about a more just, equitable, and peaceful future, An Idea Called Tomorrow showcases new works by fifteen contemporary artists that imagine what a civil future looks like. Also on view in conjunction with this exhibition are Road to Freedom: Photographs of the Civil Rights Movement, 1956-1968 at the Skirball Cultural Center, and After 1968: Contemporary Artists and the Civil Rights Legacy at CAAM, both organized by the High Museum of Art in Atlanta.

An Idea Called Tomorrow was co-conceived by CAAM’s Visual Arts Curator, Michele Lee, with support from Erin Clancey, Associate Curator at the Skirball Cultural Center. On view at CAAM are works by artists Abdelali Dahrouch, John Outterbridge, Dominique Moody, Joyce Dallal, Charles Dickson, John Halaka, Graham Goddard, Yong Soon Min, Sonia BasSheva Manjon, Ingrid von Sydow, and Betty Nobue Kano. On view at the Skirball Cultural Center are works by artists Kim Abeles, Castillo, Graham Goddard, Dominique Moody, and Kwahuumba & Karen Seneferu.

The participating artists’ ethnicities and backgrounds are as diverse as their presentations, which address a broad range of social justice issues of both regional and global relevance, such as environmental sustainability, shelter for all, human equity, equal access and respect, healthy living, reconciliation and forgiveness, and cooperation and peace. CAAM presents the work both in its enclosed Courtyard and outside on its plaza and green landscape. The breadth of the complete installation is a colorful addition to its current gallery exhibitions.  Michele Lee states, “CAAM and the Skirball serve as a model of what can be accomplished when institutions and people work together.”

WHAT
An Idea Called Tomorrow
Featuring the work of artists Kim Abeles, Castillo, Abdelali Dahrouch, Joyce Dallal, Charles Dickson, Graham Goddard, John Halaka, Betty Nobue Kano, Kwahuumba and Karen Seneferu, Sonia BasSheva- Manjon, Yong Soon Min, Dominique Moody, John Outterbridge, and Ingrid von Sydow

WHEN
Dates:
Now through March 7, 2010

Hours:
Tuesday–Saturday 10am-5pm, and Sundays 11am-5pm at CAAM
Tuesday–Friday 12-5pm, and Saturday–Sunday 10am-5pm, at the Skirball Cultural Center

WHERE
California African American Museum (CAAM)
Exposition Park
600 State Drive
Los Angeles, CA 90037
Admission is free
Parking in the adjacent lot at 39th and Figueroa Streets is $8.00 all day

Skirball Cultural Center
2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90049
Museum admission: $10 General; $7 Seniors, Full-Time Students, and Children over 12; $5 Children 2–12. Exhibitions are always free to Skirball Members and Children under 2. Museum admission is free to all visitors on Thursdays.
Parking is free

FOR MORE INFORMATION
For information about CAAM, the public may call (213) 744-7432 or visit www.caamuseum.org

For information about the Skirball Cultural Center, the public may call (310) 440-4500 or visit www.skirball.org

PRESS CONTACT
Brent Turner
the Campbells public relations
323.300.6132
brent@thecampbellspr.com

ABOUT CALIFORNIA AFRICAN AMERICAN MUSEUM (CAAM)
CAAM is located in Exposition Park at 600 State Drive, Los Angeles 90037. Parking in the adjacent lot at 39th and Figueroa Streets is $8.00 all day.  Admission is free.

CAAM researches, collects, preserves and interprets for public enrichment the history, art and culture of African Americans. Chartered by the California State Legislature in 1977, CAAM is a  state supported institution and a partner with the 501(c)(3) non-profit organization Friends, the Foundation of the California African American Museum.

In addition to its permanent collection, CAAM hosts specially mounted exhibitions curated through loans and its own collection, and tours CAAM exhibitions throughout California and the nation.  The Museum is open to the public Tuesday-Saturday 10am-5pm, and Sundays 11am-5pm. Admission is always free.

ABOUT THE SKIRBALL CULTURAL CENTER
The Skirball Cultural Center is dedicated to exploring the connections between 4,000 years of Jewish heritage and the vitality of American democratic ideals. It welcomes and seeks to inspire people of every ethnic and cultural identity. Guided by our respective memories and experiences, together we aspire to build a society in which all of us can feel at home. The Skirball Cultural Center achieves its mission through educational programs that explore literary, visual and performing arts from around the world; through the display and interpretation of its permanent collections and changing exhibitions; through an interactive family destination inspired by the Noah’s Ark story; and through outreach to the community.